Dear Visitor,

Our system has found that you are using an ad-blocking browser add-on.

We just wanted to let you know that our site content is, of course, available to you absolutely free of charge.

Our ads are the only way we have to be able to bring you the latest high-quality content, which is written by professional journalists, with the help of editors, graphic designers, and our site production and I.T. staff, as well as many other talented people who work around the clock for this site.

So, we ask you to add this site to your Ad Blocker’s "white list" or to simply disable your Ad Blocker while visiting this site.

Continue on this site freely
  HOME     MENU     SEARCH     NEWSLETTER    
CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIP MANAGEMENT NEWS. UPDATED 12 MINUTES AGO.
You are here: Home / Digital Life / Elon Musk Wants Killer Robot Ban
Elon Musk Wants To Save Us from Killer Robots
Elon Musk Wants To Save Us from Killer Robots
Like this on Facebook Tweet this Link thison Linkedin Link this on Google Plus
PUBLISHED:
AUGUST
21
2017
Several global robotics technology leaders, including Tesla founder Elon Musk, submitted an open letter to the United Nations, imploring governments to issue ban on "lethal autonomous weapons," also known as killer robots.

"Lethal autonomous weapons threaten to become the third revolution in warfare. Once developed, they will permit armed conflict to be fought at a scale greater than ever, and at timescales faster than humans can comprehend," the letter said. "These can be weapons of terror, weapons that despots and terrorists use against innocent populations, and weapons hacked to behave in undesirable ways."

The letter was signed by 116 founders of robotics and artificial intelligence companies from 26 countries. They added: "We do not have long to act. Once this Pandora's box is opened, it will be hard to close. We therefore implore the High Contracting Parties to find a way to protect us all from these dangers."

Concern about lethal autonomous weapons has been a topic of interest at the UN lately, which recently voted to begin formal discussions on enhancing policy regarding them.

In December, 123 member nations of the UN's Review Conference of the Convention on Conventional Weapons unanimously agreed to begin formal discussions on autonomous weapons. But only 19 have called for a complete ban.

"Once these weapons exist, there will be no stopping them. The time to act on a pre-emptive ban is now," said Steve Goose, arms director of Human Rights Watch.

© 2017 UPI International Top News under contract with NewsEdge/Acquire Media. All rights reserved.

Image credit: iStock/Artist's concept.

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:

Like Us on FacebookFollow Us on Twitter
MORE IN DIGITAL LIFE
CRM DAILY
NEWSFACTOR NETWORK SITES
NEWSFACTOR SERVICES
© Copyright 2017 NewsFactor Network. All rights reserved. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.