Newsletters
Customer Relationship Management News NewsFactor Sites:       NewsFactor.com     Enterprise Security Today     CRM Daily     Business Report     Sci-Tech Today  
   
Home CRM Systems Customer Service Contact Centers Business Intelligence More Topics...
Big Data
Tame your scariest paperwork. Find Out How
Average Rating:
Rate this article:  
No. 1 IT Security Worry:
No. 1 IT Security Worry: 'Hacktivists' Like Anonymous

By Barry Levine
April 24, 2012 11:16AM

Bookmark and Share
A report by security firm Bit9, titled 2012 Cyber Security Research, found that 64 percent of the 2,000 IT security experts surveyed expected their organization to be the target of a cyber-attack within the next six months, with "hacktivists" like Anonymous the main threat, followed by cyber-criminals and nation-states.
 



What is the No. 1 security worry for IT professionals? According to a new report, it's "hacktivists" from Anonymous.

The new survey by security firm Bit9, titled 2012 Cyber Security Research, finds that cyber-criminals and nation-states take second and third place among the top three worries. The survey queried nearly 2,000 IT security experts in the U.S. and Europe about the current state of enterprise security.

China, Russia

Sixty-one percent of those surveyed said Anonymous and other hacktivist groups are most likely to target their organizations, with 55 percent believing that cyber-criminals will hit them and 48 percent fearing attacks by nation states.

The report found that 64 percent of respondents expect their organization to be the target of a cyber-attack within the next six months. Among those that fear nation-states, China is the main concern, followed by Russia.

Harry Sverdlove, Bit9's chief technology officer, said in a statement that the survey "highlights how the quickly changing criminal landscape is impacting IT professionals worldwide."

An overwhelming 74 percent of respondents believe that their security measures on employees' machines are not doing enough to protect against these threats. But, while endpoints -- laptops and desktops -- are considered the weakest link, 40 percent of respondents felt that infrastructure servers had the most effective security and 36 percent felt that way about file servers -- in spite of the fact that servers are frequent targets.

Role of Employees

Disgruntled employees, long considered a security threat, are seen by only 28 percent as a concern for their companies.

Fifty-eight percent said implementation of best practices and better security policies are the best ways to improve security in the enterprise, and 19 percent said individual employees could play "an important role" in improving security.

Forty-five percent see malware as the main attack method, including Trojans and rootkits, while 17 percent are most worried about "spear phishing," in which the source of a malicious e-mail appears to come from someone within the company. Although hacktivist attacks were the most worrisome, only 11 percent were concerned about one of the most common methods from those attackers, denial of service, and only 4 percent were worried about SQL injection.

When a breach does occur, an overwhelming 95 percent of those surveyed said that customers and the public should be notified. Nearly half, or 48 percent, said that the notification should include a description of what was taken, and 29 percent said that a description of how the attack took place is also warranted. Six percent felt the company had no obligation to disclose anything.

Charles King, an analyst with Pund-IT, said that many IT departments see security threats as much more organized these days, and that many of them come from parts of the former Soviet Union -- especially threats involving identity fraud for financial gain.

He said it appeared that many of the attacks from China are focused on state and corporate secrets, and that, "since the Internet is so tightly controlled there, it's hard to imagine that the Chinese government is not complicit."
 

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:





 Big Data
1.   Microsoft, IBM Cloud Catching AWS
2.   Watson's First Consumer-Facing Gig
3.   HP Drops $50M on Hortonworks
4.   IBM, California Partner in the Cloud
5.   Teradata Bets Big on 2 Big Data Buys


advertisement
Comcast Customer Service Fiasco
Lessons to be learned for all companies.
Average Rating:
Apple, IBM Team on Mobile Biz Apps
A match made in technology heaven.
Average Rating:
U.K. Wants Data Retention Law
After citizens right-to-privacy verdict.
Average Rating:


advertisement
Product Information and Resources for Technology You Can Use To Boost Your Business

Network Security Spotlight
Researchers Working To Fix Tor Security Exploit
Developers for the Tor privacy browser are scrambling to fix a bug revealed Monday that researchers say could allow hackers, or government surveillance agencies, to track users online.
 
Wall Street Journal Hacked Again
Hacked again. That’s the story at the Wall Street Journal this week as the newspaper reports that the computer systems housing some of its news graphics were breached. Customers not affected -- yet.
 
Dropbox for Business Beefs Up Security
Dropbox is upping its game for business users. The cloud-based storage and sharing company has rolled out new security, search and other features to boost its appeal for businesses.
 

Enterprise Hardware Spotlight
Watson Gets His First Customer Service Gig
Since appearing on Jeopardy, IBM's Watson supercomputer has been making a living using his super-intelligent knowledge base for business verticals. Now, Watson's been hired for his first customer service job.
 
Tablet Giants Apple and Samsung Feel the Heat
When a company saturates its home market with a once-hot product, expect it to pump up efforts elsewhere. Apple, for its part, is now pushing iPads to big corporations and the enterprise market.
 
Microsoft Makes Design Central to Its Future
Over the last four years, Microsoft has doubled the number of designers it employs, putting a priority on fashioning devices that work around people's lives -- and that are attractive and cool.
 

Mobile Technology Spotlight
T-Mobile Calls 'BS' on AT&T's New Promotion
While Verizon Wireless is moving to throttle bandwidth hogs, a scrappy T-Mobile is taking on the giants with a limited-time promotion it hopes will drive up the churn rates of its wireless rivals.
 
Microsoft Update to Windows Phone 8.1 Already Coming
An update to Windows Phone 8.1 is on the way just weeks after the release of the product itself. Microsoft has begun detailing some of the update features to phone manufacturers.
 
Stanford Researchers Report Battery Breakthrough
Stanford researchers have found a way to use lithium in a battery's anode, a breakthrough that could triple capacity and has been described as the "holy grail of battery science."
 

Navigation
CRM Daily
Home/Top News | CRM Systems | Customer Service | Contact Centers | Business Intelligence | Sales & Marketing | Customer Data | CRM Press Releases
NewsFactor Network Enterprise I.T. Sites
NewsFactor Technology News | Enterprise Security Today | CRM Daily

NewsFactor Business and Innovation Sites
Sci-Tech Today | NewsFactor Business Report

NewsFactor Services
FreeNewsFeed | Free Newsletters

About NewsFactor Network | How To Contact Us | Article Reprints | Careers @ NewsFactor | Services for PR Pros | Top Tech Wire | How To Advertise

Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
© Copyright 2000-2014 NewsFactor Network. All rights reserved. Article rating technology by Blogowogo. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.