Newsletters
Customer Relationship Management News NewsFactor Sites:       NewsFactor.com     Enterprise Security Today     CRM Daily     Business Report     Sci-Tech Today  
   
This ad will display for the next 20 seconds. Please click for more information, or scroll down to pass the ad, or Close Ad.
Home CRM Systems Customer Service Business Intelligence Sales & Marketing More Topics...
Eliminate costly downtime!
Find out how with Free White Paper
& enter to win a Samsung Galaxy Note

www.apc.com
Druva Resource Center
24/7/365 Network Uptime!
Average Rating:
Rate this article:  
Google Rejects EU
Google Rejects EU's Renewed Call for Privacy Policy Delay

By Mark Long
February 28, 2012 2:46PM

Bookmark and Share
A Google spokesperson said the company remained committed to providing "users with a seamless experience across Google's services, and to making our privacy commitments to them easy to understand." However, European regulators said the simplification of Google's privacy policy was at the expense of transparency and comprehensiveness.
 

Related Topics

Google
Privacy
FTC
European Union


European regulators have reached a preliminary conclusion that Google's coming privacy policy changes fail to fulfill the mandatory requirements of European data protection legislation and have delivered to Google a second request that asks for a delay in their implementation.

France's Commission nationale de l'informatique et des libertés, or CNIL, has called upon Google to postpone the privacy policy makeover scheduled for March 1. The CNIL is leading an investigation by the Article 29 Working Party, an independent European advisory body on data protection and privacy, into Google's privacy policy changes.

"The CNIL and the EU data protection authorities are deeply concerned about the combination of personal data across services," CNIL President Isabelle Falque-Pierrotin wrote in a letter to Google CEO Larry Page on Monday. "They have strong doubt about the lawfulness and fairness of such processing, and about its compliance with European data protection legislation."

In Need of Constructive Feedback

Earlier this month Google rejected the Article 29 Working Party's initial request for a delay. "At no stage did any EU regulator suggest that any sort of pause would be appropriate," Google Global Privacy Counsel Peter Fleischer wrote in a letter to the Article 29 Working Party.

In the letter Monday, however, CNIL's Falque-Pierrotin denied that Google had taken all the necessary steps to fully consult with European authorities.

"Contrary to public statements made by Google representatives," Falque-Pierrotin wrote, "not all authorities were informed." Moreover, the European regulators that were notified about pending privacy policy changes were only able to review the actual contents "a few hours before its public release, without any opportunity to provide any constructive feedback," she wrote.

Google noted Tuesday that it has asked to meet with the CNIL on several occasions over the past month to answer any questions they might have, and that offer remains open. However, in a written response sent to Falque-Pierrotin on Tuesday, Google said it is not in a position to pause the worldwide launch of its new privacy policy as it would "cause a great deal of confusion for users."

"We believe we've found a reasonable balance between the Working Party's recommendations: to 'streamline and simplify' our policies while providing 'comprehensive information' to users," Google said in an e-mail statement.

Lacking Transparency

Falque-Pierrotin welcomed Google's efforts to increase public awareness about the changes. However, she said it was regrettable that Google's new policy only provides users with general information about all the services and types of personal data that are involved.

This makes it impossible "for average users who read the new policy to distinguish which purposes, collected data, recipients or access rights are currently relevant to their use of a particular Google service," Falque-Pierrotin said.

A Google spokesperson said Tuesday that the company remained committed to providing "users with a seamless experience across Google's services, and to making our privacy commitments to them easy to understand." However, Falque-Pierrotin told Page that the simplification of Google's privacy policy notification has come at the expense of transparency and comprehensiveness.

By only telling users what Google will not do with their personal data, Google had failed to meet current European regulatory requirements, Falque-Pierrotin said.

"Our preliminary investigation shows that it is extremely difficult to know exactly which data is combined between which services [and] for which purposes -- even for trained privacy professionals," she said.

"In addition, Google is using cookies -- among other tools -- for these combinations and in this regard it is not clear how Google aims to comply with the principle of consent" under European regulations, Falque-Pierrotin added.
 

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:



Barium Ferrite Is The Future Of Tape: Barium Ferrite (BaFe) offers greater capacity, superior performance, and longer archival life compared to legacy metal particle (MP) tape. Click here to learn more.


 Druva Resource Center
1.   Druva inSync Earns Highest Marks
2.   Druva VP Named an IT 'Channel Chief'
3.   Do You Need a Chief Data Officer?
4.   Do One Thing To Make the Net Safer
5.   Druva inSync Boosting BYOD Security


advertisement


advertisement
Product Information and Resources for Technology You Can Use To Boost Your Business

Network Security Spotlight
Tech Giants Fund Initiative To Prevent Future Heartbleeds
Can more funding prevent Heartbleed vulnerabilities in future open-source software? A new Core Infrastructure Initiative at the Linux Foundation is attempting to find out.
 
What Verizon's Data Breach Report Can Teach Enterprises
It’s probably not a jaw-dropper, but cyberespionage is officially on the rise. And the use of stolen or misused credentials is still the leading way the bad guys gain access to corporate information.
 
Top Cyberthreats Exposed by Verizon Report
Beyond Heartbleed, there are cyberthreats vying to take down enterprise networks, corrupt smartphones, and wreak havoc on businesses. Verizon is exposing these threats in a new report.
 

Navigation
CRM Daily
Home/Top News | CRM Systems | Customer Service | Business Intelligence | Sales & Marketing | Contact Centers | Customer Data | CRM Press Releases
NewsFactor Network Enterprise I.T. Sites
NewsFactor Technology News | Enterprise Security Today | CRM Daily

NewsFactor Business and Innovation Sites
Sci-Tech Today | NewsFactor Business Report

NewsFactor Services
FreeNewsFeed | Free Newsletters | XML/RSS Feed

About NewsFactor Network | How To Contact Us | Article Reprints | Careers @ NewsFactor | Services for PR Pros | Top Tech Wire | How To Advertise

Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
© Copyright 2000-2014 NewsFactor Network. All rights reserved. Article rating technology by Blogowogo. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.