Newsletters
Customer Relationship Management News NewsFactor Sites:       NewsFactor.com     Enterprise Security Today     CRM Daily     Business Report     Sci-Tech Today  
   
This ad will display for the next 20 seconds. Click for more information, or
Home CRM Systems Customer Service Contact Centers Business Intelligence More Topics...
Mobile Tech
Tame your scariest paperwork. Find Out How
Average Rating:
Rate this article:  
Free Apps Eat Battery Life, Researchers Find
Free Apps Eat Battery Life, Researchers Find

By Adam Dickter
March 20, 2012 6:09PM

Bookmark and Share
The team found that in the most popular free apps, performing the task related to the purpose of the free app, chess in a chess game for instance, consumes just 10 percent to 30 percent of power demand. The apps prevent a phone from going into sleep mode while exchanging data with servers.
 



If you've loaded up your smartphone or tablet with free apps and find your battery life taking a turn for the worse, it's not likely a coincidence.

The mobile advertisements on which free app developers depend to earn their profits are using up enough 3G or Wi-Fi connection to seriously drain your battery, say two researchers at Purdue University working with a Microsoft researcher.

In fact, Purdue's Abinhav Pathak and Y. Charlie Hu and Microsoft's Ming Zhang in their research paper said they believed that up to 75 percent of the energy that free apps like Angry Birds and The New York Times consume is spent marking your location and fetching suitable mobile ads to throw your way.

They used eProf -- "a fine-grained energy profiler for smartphone apps" -- to measure the performance of top apps from the Android Market, including Facebook, Angry Birds and Android browser, finding that in six of them "65% to 75% of energy is spent on third-party advertising modules."

The paper was first reported by the Web site New Scientist.

No Going to Sleep

The researchers noted that even as the app market explodes into a projected $38 billion industry by 2015, "their utility has been and will be severely limited by battery life," which makes optimizing power consumption crucial.

Still, using the eProf profiler, the team found that in the most popular apps, performing the task related to the purpose of the app, chess in a chess game for instance, consumes just 10 percent to 30 percent of power demand.

The apps prevent a phone from going into sleep mode with "wakelocks" that override the operating system's sleep policies, keeping the connection to the application program interface open for a short period even after use of the app is complete.

Apps that depend on other phone features such as the camera or GPS can keep those devices active after use, consuming power until they are turned off by another application, say the researchers.

Asynchronous Power Behavior

"Such asynchronous power behavior poses challenges to correctly attributing the energy consumption of the whole phone to individual program entities," write the researchers.

While the news may steer some phone users to more carefully scrutinize the apps they download, free apps will likely remain popular despite their drawbacks.

In 2011, 96 percent of smartphone apps were downloaded for free, according to market research firm IHS.

However, the firm found that "freemium" apps, those that entice users to a higher level of service once they get the initial free app, are very popular, representing nearly half of Apple iPhone's top-earning apps in 2011 and 31 percent of the top-earning Android Market apps.

"People are still open to receiving fee apps as long as they some sense of value -- especially those that are game related," said analyst Kirk Parsons of J.D. Power and Associates.
 

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:



APC has an established a reputation for solid products that virtually pay for themselves upon installation. Who has time to spend worrying about system downtime? APC makes it easy for you to focus on business growth instead of business downtime with reliable data center systems and IT solutions. Learn more here.


 Mobile Tech
1.   Android 'Fake ID' Puts Millions at Risk
2.   FTC Wants Fix for Mobile Cramming
3.   Facebook To Force Use of Messenger
4.   BlackBerry Acquires Secusmart
5.   T-Mobile Calls 'BS' on AT&T Promo


advertisement
Android 'Fake ID' Puts Millions at Risk
Users: stick to apps from Google Play.
Average Rating:
FTC Wants Fix for Mobile Cramming
Overcharges are 'the perfect scam'.
Average Rating:
BlackBerry Acquires Secusmart
German security firm offers street cred.
Average Rating:


advertisement
Product Information and Resources for Technology You Can Use To Boost Your Business

Network Security Spotlight
Canadian Government Charges China With Cyberattack
The government of Canada is not happy with China. Canadian officials have accused "a highly sophisticated Chinese state-sponsored actor" of launching a cyberattack on its National Research Council.
 
Researchers Working To Fix Tor Security Exploit
Developers for the Tor privacy browser are scrambling to fix a bug revealed Monday that researchers say could allow hackers, or government surveillance agencies, to track users online.
 
Wall Street Journal Hacked Again
Hacked again. That’s the story at the Wall Street Journal this week as the newspaper reports that the computer systems housing some of its news graphics were breached. Customers not affected -- yet.
 

Enterprise Hardware Spotlight
Apple Updates MacBook Pros, Cuts Prices Up to $100
The popular MacBook Pro laptop line just got an update and a price cut of as much as $100. The MacBook Pro with Retina display now includes faster processors and double the memory.
 
Watson Gets His First Customer Service Gig
Since appearing on Jeopardy, IBM's Watson supercomputer has been making a living using his super-intelligent knowledge base for business verticals. Now, Watson's been hired for his first customer service job.
 
Tablet Giants Apple and Samsung Feel the Heat
When a company saturates its home market with a once-hot product, expect it to pump up efforts elsewhere. Apple, for its part, is now pushing iPads to big corporations and the enterprise market.
 

Mobile Technology Spotlight
Android 'Fake ID' Puts Millions of Users at Risk
Having this fake ID is nothing to brag about, even if you are a minor. The “Fake ID” Android flaw drops malware into smartphone apps. It can steal credit card data and even take over your device.
 
FTC Wants Fix for 'Perfect Scam' of Mobile Cramming
The U.S. Federal Trade Commission has issued new guidelines to curb “mobile cramming,” a troublesome practice that adds unauthorized third-party charges to mobile phone bills.
 
Facebook: You Will Use Messenger, and You Will Like It
Starting this week, Facebook users with Android and iOS phones will be forced to use the separate Messenger app to send Facebook messages. Pending messages will still be visible in the main app.
 

Navigation
CRM Daily
Home/Top News | CRM Systems | Customer Service | Contact Centers | Business Intelligence | Sales & Marketing | Customer Data | CRM Press Releases
NewsFactor Network Enterprise I.T. Sites
NewsFactor Technology News | Enterprise Security Today | CRM Daily

NewsFactor Business and Innovation Sites
Sci-Tech Today | NewsFactor Business Report

NewsFactor Services
FreeNewsFeed | Free Newsletters

About NewsFactor Network | How To Contact Us | Article Reprints | Careers @ NewsFactor | Services for PR Pros | Top Tech Wire | How To Advertise

Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
© Copyright 2000-2014 NewsFactor Network. All rights reserved. Article rating technology by Blogowogo. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.