Newsletters
Customer Relationship Management News NewsFactor Sites:       NewsFactor.com     Enterprise Security Today     CRM Daily     Business Report     Sci-Tech Today  
   
Home CRM Systems Customer Service Contact Centers Business Intelligence More Topics...
Digital Life
24/7/365 Network Uptime!
Average Rating:
Rate this article:  
New Street View Revelations May Spur Investigations
New Street View Revelations May Spur Investigations

By Barry Levine
May 2, 2012 4:34PM

Bookmark and Share
New reports indicate that privacy regulators in Great Britain, France, and Germany may reopen or expand their investigations into privacy issues with Google Street View , since this latest bit of information contradicts Google's explanation to them, and suggests there might be wider privacy infringements with Google Street View.
 



Google may have thought it dodged a bullet recently after the Federal Communications Commission imposed a small fine for impeding investigation into the company's Street View project, then dropped the matter. But new developments indicate the controversy could be coming back.

On Monday, The New York Times published a story identifying the Google engineer who wrote the software that collected private electronic data as the Street View cars were cruising streets around the U.S. and other countries, primarily to take photos for Google Maps. The FCC had noted that it had been unable to continue its investigation in part because the engineer had invoked his Fifth Amendment rights against self-incrimination.

Rogue Engineer?

The Times reported that the engineer was Marius Milner, who is said to be highly regarded in Wi-Fi networking. The FCC had said it knew the engineer's name from Google, which had identified him to state investigators, but the FCC had chosen to describe him as Engineer Doe.

More important, his explanations in the recently released full FCC report contradicted Google's contention that the data-gathering software was the act of a rogue employee.

The released FCC report said that Milner told at least one supervisor and as many as seven other engineers about his efforts, and that data harvesting without a great deal of regard for privacy was a regular mode of working at Google. He also said that his intentions were outlined in a proposal to his managers.

That revelation has led at least one consumer advocacy group to file a federal Freedom of Information Act request with the FCC, seeking all related documents.

Additionally, new reports on Wednesday indicate that privacy regulators in Great Britain, France, and Germany may reopen or expand their investigations, since this latest bit of information contradicts Google's explanation to them, and suggests there might be wider infringements.

Up until this point, all the European investigations into Street View except two in Germany had been resolved.

'Wasn't a Mistake'

Hamburg's data protection commissioner, Johannes Caspar, told the Times that his agency "had been told that it was a simple mistake, as the company had told us." But, he said, they are now "learning that this wasn't a mistake and that people within the company knew this information was being collected."

New or reinvigorated investigations in the U.S. are also possible. In response to the new information, Rep. Edward J. Markey, D-Mass., has called on Google to more fully explain what it knew about the data collection. An investigation by more than 40 state attorneys general is continuing, as are almost a dozen civil lawsuits.

The FCC fine of $25,000 had been for noncompliance with its requests, and the agency had reported that it would "not take enforcement action" for collection of payload data, because there is "no clear precedent" for applying the Communications Act to the collection of Wi-Fi data, especially because the data was unencrypted.

A separate inquiry by the Federal Trade Commission in 2010 had resulted in Google's agreement to set up internal privacy controls and methods.
 

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:





 Digital Life
1.   'Right To Be Forgotten': 26 Questions
2.   Civil War Battle Sites Get Mobile App
3.   Is the Amazon Fire Phone a Winner?
4.   Earnings, Excitement Grow for Apple
5.   Protect Yourself from Identity Theft


advertisement
Apple Digital Book Settlement Set
But company still appealing decision.
Average Rating:
Radical.FM's Freemium Biz Model
Online radio startup asks for donations.
Average Rating:
Facebook Social Experiment Irks Us
Secretive test was legal, but ethical?
Average Rating:


advertisement
Product Information and Resources for Technology You Can Use To Boost Your Business

Network Security Spotlight
Researchers Working To Fix Tor Security Exploit
Developers for the Tor privacy browser are scrambling to fix a bug revealed Monday that researchers say could allow hackers, or government surveillance agencies, to track users online.
 
Wall Street Journal Hacked Again
Hacked again. That’s the story at the Wall Street Journal this week as the newspaper reports that the computer systems housing some of its news graphics were breached. Customers not affected -- yet.
 
Dropbox for Business Beefs Up Security
Dropbox is upping its game for business users. The cloud-based storage and sharing company has rolled out new security, search and other features to boost its appeal for businesses.
 

Enterprise Hardware Spotlight
Watson Gets His First Customer Service Gig
Since appearing on Jeopardy, IBM's Watson supercomputer has been making a living using his super-intelligent knowledge base for business verticals. Now, Watson's been hired for his first customer service job.
 
Tablet Giants Apple and Samsung Feel the Heat
When a company saturates its home market with a once-hot product, expect it to pump up efforts elsewhere. Apple, for its part, is now pushing iPads to big corporations and the enterprise market.
 
Microsoft Makes Design Central to Its Future
Over the last four years, Microsoft has doubled the number of designers it employs, putting a priority on fashioning devices that work around people's lives -- and that are attractive and cool.
 

Mobile Technology Spotlight
Tablet Giants Apple and Samsung Feel the Heat
When a company saturates its home market with a once-hot product, expect it to pump up efforts elsewhere. Apple, for its part, is now pushing iPads to big corporations and the enterprise market.
 
Is the Amazon Fire Phone a Winner?
A late entry into a packed category of smartphones, Amazon's Fire phone offers a variety of unique features. Now, the reviewers are assessing if they're enough to make the phone stand out.
 
Review: Amazon Fire Offers New Ways To Use Phones
The Fire phone uses Android, but Amazon has modified it to the point that it's barely recognizable. That means the phone offers new ways to navigate, discover and, of course, shop.
 

Navigation
CRM Daily
Home/Top News | CRM Systems | Customer Service | Contact Centers | Business Intelligence | Sales & Marketing | Customer Data | CRM Press Releases
NewsFactor Network Enterprise I.T. Sites
NewsFactor Technology News | Enterprise Security Today | CRM Daily

NewsFactor Business and Innovation Sites
Sci-Tech Today | NewsFactor Business Report

NewsFactor Services
FreeNewsFeed | Free Newsletters

About NewsFactor Network | How To Contact Us | Article Reprints | Careers @ NewsFactor | Services for PR Pros | Top Tech Wire | How To Advertise

Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
© Copyright 2000-2014 NewsFactor Network. All rights reserved. Article rating technology by Blogowogo. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.