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You are here: Home / World Wide Web / Facebook Gets Tough on Video Piracy
Facebook Gets Tough on Online Video Piracy
Facebook Gets Tough on Online Video Piracy
By Jef Cozza / CRM Daily Like this on Facebook Tweet this Link thison Linkedin Link this on Google Plus
PUBLISHED:
AUGUST
30
2015
Copyright owners just got a big gift from Facebook. The social media giant announced it will offer new tools to enable content owners to identify and remove unauthorized video content that is uploaded to the network without their permission.

Additionally, Facebook said it is working to improve the technology it uses to identify copyrighted material. The company is also making improvements to its existing reporting procedures to speed up the process of having offending videos removed from the site. The company said it will move to ban repeat offenders from returning to the site.

Rapid Video Growth

Facebook is somewhat late to the game when it comes to dealing with the problem of video privacy. The site’s focus on allowing users to share videos on their feeds is only about a year old, while YouTube has been in the video-sharing business for a decade.

Nevertheless, video content has grown quickly on the social network. Not only are users sharing content, but publishers and advertisers are also uploading video features as well. The rapid growth appears to have left Facebook a little flat-footed with regard to the issue of piracy.

“We’ve heard from some of our content partners that third parties too frequently misuse their content on Facebook,” the company said in a recent blog post. “This practice has been called ‘freebooting,’ and it’s not fair to those who work hard to create amazing videos.”

Improving Old Tools, Developing New Ones

Facebook said that it already has several tools in place to combat the problem. For example, videos uploaded to the site are run through an audio fingerprinting system called Audible Magic, which uses sound to help identify and prevent unauthorized videos from making their way onto the platform.

Still, that hasn’t been enough to appease the demands of irate content owners who have complained that Facebook’s practices are not enough. “These existing measures work well for many creators, but some publishers with particular needs, including creators whose videos have gone viral, have been asking for more tools,” the company said.

In response, Facebook said it is working with Audible Magic to improve the technology behind its voice fingerprinting system. In addition, the company said it is developing a video matching tool that it will make available to some creators. The new technology will be able to evaluate millions of video uploads daily across pages, profiles, groups, and geographies, the company said.

Facebook plans to release a beta version of the video matching tool soon to a small group of media companies, multi-channel networks, and individual media creators. Still, it will likely take several years for Facebook to build an anti-piracy system as effective as YouTube’s, which has been working on video content recognition for years.

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Sudip Kumar Dutta:
Posted: 2015-08-31 @ 4:14am PT
Facebook being an interactive and sharing social platform, restricting sharing of videos in it to prevent piracy, protect copyright etc. will hamper Facebook’s utility. Will all respect to copyrights, I’d say, ‘Freebooting’ is a rare problem, after all this is not a film viewing platform, Facebook pals share videos clippings only vis-à-vis commercially successful full movies getting hall copied easily at multiplexes.

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