Dear Visitor,

Our system has found that you are using an ad-blocking browser add-on.

We just wanted to let you know that our site content is, of course, available to you absolutely free of charge.

Our ads are the only way we have to be able to bring you the latest high-quality content, which is written by professional journalists, with the help of editors, graphic designers, and our site production and I.T. staff, as well as many other talented people who work around the clock for this site.

So, we ask you to add this site to your Ad Blocker’s "white list" or to simply disable your Ad Blocker while visiting this site.

Continue on this site freely
  HOME     MENU     SEARCH     NEWSLETTER    
CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIP MANAGEMENT NEWS. UPDATED 14 MINUTES AGO.
You are here: Home / Science & Discovery / Nobel Prize Honors Molecule Tech
Nobel Prize Honors Technique That Reveals Molecules' Details
Nobel Prize Honors Technique That Reveals Molecules' Details
By Jim Heintz and David Keyton Like this on Facebook Tweet this Link thison Linkedin Link this on Google Plus
PUBLISHED:
OCTOBER
04
2017
Three researchers based in the U.S., U.K. and Switzerland won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry on Wednesday for developing a way to create detailed images of the molecules that drive life -- a technology that the Nobel committee said allowed scientists to visualize molecular processes they had never previously seen.

The 9-million-kronor ($1.1 million) prize is shared by Jacques Dubochet of the University of Lausanne, Joachim Frank at New York's Columbia University and Richard Henderson of MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, Britain.

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said their method, called cryo-electron microscopy, allows researchers to "freeze biomolecules" mid-movement. The technology "is decisive for both the basic understanding of life's chemistry and for the development of pharmaceuticals," it said.

Frank said he was "fully overwhelmed" on hearing he had won.

"I thought the chances of a Nobel Prize were minuscule because there are so many other innovations and discoveries that happen almost everyday," he told a news conference by phone. "So yes, I was in a way speechless."

Explaining the significance of the technology, Nobel chemistry committee member Heiner Linke said it enables scientists to "see down to the position of individual atoms to be able to see how these molecules interact with one another, what complexes they build, how these complex machineries work."

"It's really the first time that we can see biological molecules in their natural environment and how they actually work together down to the individual atoms," he added.

Electron microscopes once were thought to be useful only for examining nonliving material because the electron beam destroys biological material. But cryo-technology -- freezing material at extremely low temperatures -- protected the examined material from damage.

Frank developed mathematical models to sharpen fuzzy electron microscope images and Henderson, in 1990, was able to generate a 3-D image of a protein at atom-level resolution.

Dubrochet's contribution was to freeze the water in the sample being examined so quickly that it vitrified -- forming a kind of glass rather than ice, whose crystalline structure diffracted the electron beam.

The annual prize rewards researchers for major advances in studying the infinitesimal bits of material that are the building blocks of life.

Recent prizes have gone to scientists who developed molecular "machines" -- molecules with controllable motions -- and who mapped how cells repair damaged DNA, leading to improved cancer treatments.

It's the third Nobel announced this week.

The medicine prize went to three Americans studying circadian rhythms: Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael W. Young. The physics prize went to Rainer Weiss, Barry Barish and Kip Thorne for detecting gravitational waves.

The literature winner will be named Thursday and the peace prize will be announced Friday.

© 2017 Associated Press under contract with NewsEdge/Acquire Media. All rights reserved.
Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:

Like Us on FacebookFollow Us on Twitter
MORE IN SCIENCE & DISCOVERY

NETWORK SECURITY SPOTLIGHT
President Trump has banned the U.S. government from using Kaspersky. The Russian cybersecurity company has been accused of -- but denied -- being in cahoots with Kremlin espionage.

CRM DAILY
NEWSFACTOR NETWORK SITES
NEWSFACTOR SERVICES
© Copyright 2017 NewsFactor Network. All rights reserved. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.