Newsletters
Customer Relationship Management News NewsFactor Sites:       NewsFactor.com     Enterprise Security Today     CRM Daily     Business Report     Sci-Tech Today  
   
Home CRM Systems Customer Service Contact Centers Business Intelligence More Topics...
Laptops & Tablets
24/7/365 Network Uptime!
Average Rating:
Rate this article:  
Is the New Samsung Galaxy S an iPad Killer?
Is the New Samsung Galaxy S an iPad Killer?

By Jennifer LeClaire
June 13, 2014 12:10PM

Bookmark and Share
"This is a very, very nice tablet," said analyst Avi Greengart of the new Samsung Galaxy Tab S. "Samsung has been growing its sales and this is again a great product, but I don't think a brighter display and a tablet that's a millimeter thinner is going to change the calculus for most premium tablet buyers that are still going to end up with an iPad."
 



Samsung is directly targeting the iPad Air with its latest premium tablet versions. The company just launched the Galaxy Tab S with a WQXGA Super AMOLED screen that delivers the most vibrant tablet display on the market.

The Galaxy Tab S offers Samsung screen technologies like Adaptive Display, which adjusts the gamma, saturation, and sharpness based on what you are viewing, the temperature of the viewing environment and ambient lighting. And advanced outdoor visibility technology means users can see their content even in bright sunlight.

Samsung also promises energy savings with its new Galaxy Tab S by using the Super AMOLED technology instead of power-consuming LCD displays. Both of the Tab S models are just 0.26 inches thick. The 10.5-inch screen device weighs in at 1 pound, while the 8.4-inch model weighs 10 ounces.

Samsung's Achilles Heel

We caught up with Avi Greengart, an analyst at Current Analysis, to get his take on the new tablet, which some are calling an iPad killer. He told us the Samsung Tab S can compete on specs with anyone, including Apple.

"It has a spectacular display. It is thinner and slightly lighter than the equivalent iPad Air and iPad mini Retina," he said. "So if you are looking for a premium tablet and you are basing your purchasing decision on specs alone, you will be buying a Samsung Galaxy S every time."

The problem for Samsung is that tablet consumers do not buy solely on specs. Rather, they also take into consideration build quality. As Greengart sees it, Apple's aluminum designs are significantly more premium than the plastic found on the Galaxy Tab S casing. But the biggest decision factor is the app ecosystem.

"Apple's iOS has a commanding lead in that respect. That's not to take anything away from Samsung. There isn't much Samsung can do to fix that problem. That's really Google's problem," Greengart said. "Samsung is doing everything it can to compete on hardware and is also throwing in a lot of software and software partnerships and free content to come as close as they can to saying there is optimized content for our device, too."

iPad Still Wins

To Greengart's point, Samsung's magazine service "Papergarden" debuts on the Galaxy Tab S. Samsung also announced a strategic partnership with Marvel to access more than 15,000 Marvel Comics through three months of unlimited free membership to Marvel's "Marvel Unlimited" app. Then there's Kindle for Samsung, with exclusive offers for the Galaxy Tab S.

Is it enough? Greengart said it may be for the consumer who is primarily looking to watch videos and browse the Web. He also points to a large consumer base of Samsung Galaxy S 4 and 5 users who are already familiar with the interface.

"This is a very, very nice tablet," Greengart said. "Samsung has been growing its sales and this is again a great product, but I don't think a brighter display and a tablet that's a millimeter thinner is going to change the calculus for most premium tablet buyers that are still going to end up with an iPad."

The Samsung Galaxy Tab S will come with Wi-Fi, or with Wi-Fi and LTE, and will be available with 16 or 32 GB of internal memory. All the versions also can accommodate a MicroSD card of up to 128 GB of external memory. And users can choose between Titanium Bronze or Dazzling White.

Prices begin at $399 for the smaller 8.4-inch tablet, and $499 for the 10.5-inch tablet. The Galaxy Tab S will be available in July.
 

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:

Jared:

Posted: 2014-06-15 @ 6:00pm PT
Yes then we have the people that continue to buy Android devices with an 80% worldwide viral infection rate and download apps from an app store that didn't even begin vetting apps until 2014. So we have Android people spreading viruses around the planet faster than MS could have ever have dreamed. New technology doesn't always mean the best or safest/responsible technology.

Uncle Bernie:

Posted: 2014-06-13 @ 1:38pm PT
you can have mine.

cjjeepercreeper:

Posted: 2014-06-13 @ 12:36pm PT
The idiot Apple fanboys will still buy ipads, just like they still buy iphones. There is so much better technology out there, but the Apple dummies still want to bend over and pay a premium price for old technology.



APC has an established a reputation for solid products that virtually pay for themselves upon installation. Who has time to spend worrying about system downtime? APC makes it easy for you to focus on business growth instead of business downtime with reliable data center systems and IT solutions. Learn more here.


 Laptops & Tablets
1.   MacBook Pros Get Update, Price Cut
2.   Apple and Samsung Feel the Heat
3.   Nvidia Revamps Shield as Game Tablet
4.   iPhone 6: Bad for Apple Tablet Sales?
5.   Design Central to Microsoft Future


advertisement
Design Central to Microsoft Future
New ethos a break from functional past.
Average Rating:
iPhone 6: Bad for Apple Tablet Sales?
Most likely, it will be a huge hit.
Average Rating:
Microsoft Announces $199 Laptop
Taking on Google's Chromebooks.
Average Rating:


advertisement
Product Information and Resources for Technology You Can Use To Boost Your Business

Network Security Spotlight
IBM Beefs Up Identity Intelligence Security Solutions
Big Blue is betting big on identity intelligence. IBM just acquired a private firm with security software to govern user access to apps and data across cloud and on-premise environments.
 
Tor Internet Privacy Service Warns Users It Was Breached
You may never have heard of the Tor Project, but the Internet privacy service is making headlines. Tor’s devs say users might be victims of an attack launched against the project earlier this year.
 
Canadian Government Charges China with Cyberattack
The government of Canada is not happy with China. Canadian officials have accused "a highly sophisticated Chinese state-sponsored actor" of launching a cyberattack on its National Research Council.
 

Enterprise Hardware Spotlight
AMD's ARM-Based Opteron Out in $3K Dev Kit
It's dubbed "Seattle" and it's AMD's first 64-bit ARM-based Opteron processor. The low-power chip is being released as part of AMD’s Opteron A1100-series developer kit, and aimed at high-end data center needs.
 
Apple Updates MacBook Pros, Cuts Prices Up to $100
The popular MacBook Pro laptop line just got an update and a price cut of as much as $100. The MacBook Pro with Retina display now includes faster processors and double the memory.
 
Dell, BlackBerry Not Sweating Apple-IBM Alliance
IBM's recent move to partner with Apple to sell iPhones and iPads loaded with corporate applications has excited investors in both companies, but two rivals say they are unperturbed for now.
 

Mobile Technology Spotlight
Virgin Mobile Offers Custom Smartphone Plans
As the wireless carrier wars continue heating up, Virgin Mobile just threw the customization coal onto the fire. The firm has debuted a no-annual-contract plan with rates based on individual use.
 
Collaboration Provider Asana Revamps Mobile App
Asana, a collaboration software provider started by a Facebook founder, is now out with a rebuilt native iOS mobile app. It replaces one that even the company admits was not up to par.
 
FTC Wants Fix for 'Perfect Scam' of Mobile Cramming
The U.S. Federal Trade Commission has issued new guidelines to curb “mobile cramming,” a troublesome practice that adds unauthorized third-party charges to mobile phone bills.
 

Navigation
CRM Daily
Home/Top News | CRM Systems | Customer Service | Contact Centers | Business Intelligence | Sales & Marketing | Customer Data | CRM Press Releases
NewsFactor Network Enterprise I.T. Sites
NewsFactor Technology News | Enterprise Security Today | CRM Daily

NewsFactor Business and Innovation Sites
Sci-Tech Today | NewsFactor Business Report

NewsFactor Services
FreeNewsFeed | Free Newsletters

About NewsFactor Network | How To Contact Us | Article Reprints | Careers @ NewsFactor | Services for PR Pros | Top Tech Wire | How To Advertise

Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
© Copyright 2000-2014 NewsFactor Network. All rights reserved. Article rating technology by Blogowogo. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.