HOME     MENU     SEARCH     NEWSLETTER    
CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIP MANAGEMENT NEWS. UPDATED 5 MINUTES AGO.
You are here: Home / Network Security / FBI: Era of Big Data = Era of Big Hacks
Neustar, Inc.
Protect your website & network using real-time information & analysis
www.neustar.biz
FBI: Era of Big Data = Era of Big Data Thefts
FBI: Era of Big Data = Era of Big Data Thefts
By Adam Dickter / CRM Daily Like this on Facebook Tweet this Link thison Linkedin Link this on Google Plus
PUBLISHED:
JANUARY
24
2014


The hacking of Target servers to obtain millions of passwords and credit card numbers may have been the most successful data breach in U.S. history, but the worst may be yet to come, warns the FBI.

The nation's top law enforcement agency is warning companies that deal with massive amounts of consumer data that cybercrime is on the rise, citing some 20 attacks on big companies in the past year. Target saw more than 40 million credit and debit card records affected during the holiday shopping season by its breach, and the personal information of 70 million customers was also compromised. Luxury retailer Neiman Marcus announced this week that 1.1 million of its customer accounts were compromised by hackers in the middle of last year.

Just Scraping the Surface

A Jan. 17 report sent to big data companies, "Recent Cyber Intrusion Events Directed Toward Retail Firms," was obtained by Reuters news service. It warns that the attacks involve RAM scraping at the point of service (POS), in which data from the magnetic card swipers at stores can be stolen during the brief time the data is in a computer system's memory before it is encrypted.

"The accessibility of the malware on underground forums, the affordability of the software and the huge potential profits to be made from retail POS systems in the United States make this type of financially motivated cyber crime attractive to a wide range of actors," the FBI warned in the report, as quoted by Reuters.

Calls to the FBI's New York media office regarding the report were not returned in time for publication.

Crime targeting big data is expected to be a major issue of 2014, and not only in the United States. Germany recently saw a major e-mail breach and South Korea saw a counterfeit credit card scheme affecting some 60 million accounts.

Hackers don't only engage in this activity firsthand, but design so-called root-kits to sell to others. Some security experts believe the Target hacking was accomplished using off-the-shelf malware coded by a pair of Russian teens, who then sold the malware to the cybercriminals who used it on Target.

The FBI's report, Reuters said, delves into the threat of the growing malware market, citing a program called Alina that can be remotely updated to evade detection and removal, which has been offered for sale for as little as $6,000, a small investment considering the potential net gain in illegal profit.

Big Malware

"The high dollar value gained from some of these compromises can encourage intruders to develop high-sophistication methodologies, as well as incorporate mechanisms for the actors to remain undetected," the FBI said in the report.

Chester Wisniewski, senior security analyst at Sophos, told us he was glad to see the FBI being proactive on this issue.

"We have been writing about this malware for over three years, hoping to help raise awareness among merchants and provide tools and advice to protect them as well," he said.

"While the FBI may only be hearing of a few cases, we are detecting malware similar to the Target malware more than 150 times every week."

He said Sophos would present a demonstration about the malware at the coming RSA security conference.

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:

Like Us on FacebookFollow Us on Twitter
TOP STORIES NOW
MAY INTEREST YOU
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there's a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know by accessing the white paper, "5 Things You Didn't Know About Cloud Backup". Access the White Paper now.
MORE IN NETWORK SECURITY

NETWORK SECURITY SPOTLIGHT
If you're a Google Gmail user, it's bad news. About 5 million Gmail addresses and plain text passwords were leaked to an online forum on Tuesday. The good news: the data is old, but better security is still needed.

ENTERPRISE HARDWARE SPOTLIGHT
The tech giant is expanding its cloud solutions which promise secure access to enterprise phone, email, and storage apps. The latest addition to the Dell Mobile Workspace involves Vonage and MS Office 365.

MOBILE TECHNOLOGY SPOTLIGHT
The world's highest-capacity SD card is being offered by SanDisk, 512 gigabytes of flash storage aimed at professionals shooting 4K Ultra HD video or high-speed burst mode photography. Price: $800.

Product Information and Resources for Technology You Can Use To Boost Your Business

© Copyright 2014 NewsFactor Network, Inc. All rights reserved. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.