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You are here: Home / Tech Trends / HP Will Offer 'Green' Notebook Power
HP Will Offer 'Green' Boston Power Notebook Batteries
HP Will Offer 'Green' Boston Power Notebook Batteries
By Patricia Resende / CRM Daily Like this on Facebook Tweet this Link thison Linkedin Link this on Google Plus
PUBLISHED:
DECEMBER
10
2008
Boston Power, staying true to its goal of developing products that respect the environment, has developed a new "green" battery for notebooks. It is working with Hewlett-Packard to put the lithium-based battery in both new HP notebooks and in existing notebooks.

HP and Boston Power have been collaborating on the Sonata battery for the past three years to give customers a reliable battery friendly to the environment. HP customers purchasing new notebooks will be able to add Sonata as an upgrade, and existing notebook owners will be able to buy Sonata batteries to replace their existing batteries or as a spare.

The environmentally friendly batteries are expected to cost more.

"Consumers depend on their notebook computers as much as they do because they enable mobility -- whether being used for leisure or work activities," said Christina Lampe-Onnerud, founder and chief executive of Boston Power. "To truly empower users with that type of flexibility, batteries have to last longer and provide more dependable performance."

Saving the Environment

HP has been considering the environmental impact of its products since 1992 when it launched its Design for the Environment program to reduce the energy needed to manufacture and use HP products, reduce the amount of materials used, develop products with less environmental impact, and design equipment that is easier to upgrade and recycle.

Tapping Boston Power's batteries is part of that effort. Boston Power competes with Sony and Panasonic batteries, but its focus on the environment may have made HP's choice easier.

"HP is known around the world for delivering breakthrough technologies and meaningful innovation to consumers," said Jonathan Kaye, director of consumer notebooks at HP. "By partnering with Boston Power, we are able to offer our customers batteries with a longer lifespan and help reduce the amount of technology waste in landfills."

Longer Lasting and Safer

Boston Power's lithium-ion battery can be recharged a thousand times compared to conventional batteries that can be recharged only 300 times, according to Frost & Sullivan, a consulting company.

The Sonata battery can also achieve an 80 percent charge in 30 minutes and a full charge in one hour without degrading cell performance, according to the company. Batteries currently on the market typically take as much as one hour to reach 80 percent power in a fast-charge cycle that can degrade cell performance by 60 to 80 percent within 300 charge cycles.

The HP Enviro Series notebook batteries with Sonata technology will come with a three-year warranty, according to the manufacturer.

While the batteries are expected to last longer, they are also safer, according to the company. Fires starting from batteries in laptops have resulted in several recalls, including from Sony and Panasonic.

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