Newsletters
Customer Relationship Management News NewsFactor Sites:       NewsFactor.com     Enterprise Security Today     CRM Daily     Business Report     Sci-Tech Today  
   
Home CRM Systems Customer Service Business Intelligence Sales & Marketing More Topics...
APC Free White Paper
Optimize your network investment &
Enter to win a Samsung Galaxy Note

www.apc.com
Hackers
24/7/365 Network Uptime!
Average Rating:
Rate this article:  
Target.com Gets High Marks for Password Security
Target.com Gets High Marks for Password Security

By Jennifer Bjorhus
January 29, 2014 9:40AM

Bookmark and Share
According to a first-ever study, retailer Target tied for No. 4 in the nation for its online customer password policies. Best Buy Co. Inc. tied for No. 11 with a score of 40 (anything above 45 is considered good). Only 10 percent of the 100 retailers in the study scored 45 or above, and more than half still accept lazy passwords like "123456."
 


Target Corp. may be engulfed in data security issues, but the strength of customer passwords at Target.com isn't likely one of them.

The Minneapolis-based retailer tied for No. 4 in the nation for its online customer password policies, according to a first-ever study by the company Dashlane Inc., scoring 60 of 100 possible points. Only Apple Inc., at No. 1., scored a perfect 100.

Best Buy Co. Inc. tied for No. 11 with a score of 40. E-tailing colossus Amazon fared poorly with a score of -40, tying for No. 63.

"Anything above 45 is pretty good," said Dashlane CEO Emmanuel Schalit in an interview. "What's concerning in this study is to find so many sites, including pretty large players, that are not paying attention to this problem."

Hackers are armed with increasingly sophisticated tools to break passwords as shopping migrates online. Target and Richfield-based Best Buy are shifting more and more resources online as they work to hold their ground against e-tailers such as Amazon.com.

Only 10 percent of the 100 retailers in Dashlane's study scored 45 or above, and more than half still accept lazy passwords such as "123456," "111111" or even "password," it found. Half of the companies don't block logins even after 10 incorrect password tries, including Amazon, Dell, Best Buy, Macy's and Williams-Sonoma.

In one major D'oh!, Dashlane noted that MLB, the official site for Major League Baseball, allows shoppers to use the word "baseball." Amazon, Wal-Mart, Office Depot and Macy's were among those retailers with scores at or below 30.

Shoppers themselves don't appear to be clamoring for stricter password policies.

A separate poll out Monday in the wake of Target's data breach shows that American shoppers say they are very or extremely concerned about the safety of their personal information in stores and online, but aren't changing their behavior much to protect it. A majority said that since the breach they have not changed their online passwords at store Web sites, asked for new credit or debit card numbers from their bank or signed up for a credit monitoring service. The AP-GfK Poll surveyed 1,060 adults.

Dashlane, a venture-capital-backed password manager in Manhattan that markets to consumers, examined the password policies of the Top 100 e-commerce sites from Jan. 17-Jan. 22. It scored companies from minus 100 to 100 based on two dozen criteria such as how many characters they require, whether they require a mix of numbers and letters, whether they e-mail customer passwords in plain text, and whether they tell consumers setting up an account whether their chosen password is weak or strong. (continued...)

1  |  2  |  Next Page >

 


© 2014 Star Tribune (Minneapolis, MN) under contract with NewsEdge. All rights reserved.
 

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:



Neustar, Inc. (NYSE: NSR) is a trusted, neutral provider of real-time information and analysis to the Internet, telecommunications, information services, financial services, retail, media and advertising sectors. Neustar applies its advanced, secure technologies in location, identification, and evaluation to help its customers promote and protect their businesses. More information is available at www.neustar.biz.


 Hackers
1.   iPad Hacker Conviction Overturned
2.   Is Heartbleed the Biggest Threat Ever?
3.   Heartbleed Bug Breaks Web Security
4.   Retailers Liable for Hacking Damage?
5.   Hacker Black Markets Expanding


advertisement
Internet Devices Lure Hackers
Mundane devices end up in online crime.
Average Rating:
Is Heartbleed the Biggest Threat Ever?
Widespread extent puts millions at risk.
Average Rating:
Possible Security Breach at Calif. DMV
Millions of online customers at risk.
Average Rating:
Product Information and Resources for Technology You Can Use To Boost Your Business

Network Security Spotlight
Tips To Defeat the Heartbleed Bug
Heartbleed headlines continue as IT admins scramble for answers no one has. Early reports of stolen personal data, including 900 social insurance numbers in Canada, are starting to trickle in.
 
NSC Backs Disclosing Software Vulnerabilities
Disclosing vulnerabilities in commercial and open source software is in the national interest and shouldn't be withheld unless there is a clear need, says the National Security Council.
 
Heartbleed Flaw Affects Hardware, Too
It appears the Heartbleed security bug affects not just Web sites, but also the networking equipment that connects businesses and homes to the Net, including Cisco and Juniper's equipment.
 

Enterprise Hardware Spotlight
Vaio Fit 11A Battery Danger Forces Recall by Sony
Using a Sony Vaio Fit 11A laptop? It's time to send it back to Sony. In fact, Sony is encouraging people to stop using the laptop after several reports of its Panasonic battery overheating.
 
Continued Drop in Global PC Shipments Slows
Worldwide shipments of PCs fell during the first three months of the year, but the global slump in PC demand may be easing, with a considerable slowdown from last year's drops.
 
Google Glass Finds a Home in Medical Education, Practice
Google Glass may find its first markets in verticals in which hands-free access to data is a boon. Medicine is among the most prominent of those, as seen in a number of Glass experiments under way.
 

Mobile Technology Spotlight
Is Amazon Launching a 3D Smartphone?
Once known for selling books on an e-commerce platform, Amazon is now a bona fide hardware maker -- and it's reportedly rolling out an innovative smartphone with a 3D screen.
 
Review: S5 Features Useful, Less About Gimmicks
There's a lot to like about Samsung's new Galaxy S5 smartphone -- among them, its relative lack of features. Samsung chose to focus on features people might actually want, not gimmicks.
 
Analyst: Samsung Galaxy S5 Won't Sway iPhone Lovers
The Samsung Galaxy S5 hits store shelves on Friday and the reviews are starting to pour in. The question is: Can the latest in the Galaxy line grab more market share from Appleā€™s iPhone?
 

Navigation
CRM Daily
Home/Top News | CRM Systems | Customer Service | Business Intelligence | Sales & Marketing | Contact Centers | Customer Data | CRM Press Releases
NewsFactor Network Enterprise I.T. Sites
NewsFactor Technology News | Enterprise Security Today | CRM Daily

NewsFactor Business and Innovation Sites
Sci-Tech Today | NewsFactor Business Report

NewsFactor Services
FreeNewsFeed | Free Newsletters | XML/RSS Feed

About NewsFactor Network | How To Contact Us | Article Reprints | Careers @ NewsFactor | Services for PR Pros | Top Tech Wire | How To Advertise

Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
© Copyright 2000-2014 NewsFactor Network. All rights reserved. Article rating technology by Blogowogo. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.